Dating website photo scam online dating on gta iv

Foreign men are requested money for "visa and tickets" for the "girl" to come to USA (or another country).Money usually is requested via Western Union or Money Gram, first for visa, then for tickets, then for insurance. Her name is Ksenia Mihailovna Maksimova, 424007 Russia, Republic Mari-El, city Yoshkar-Ola Street Petrova, house 42, flat 81.

She spoke about her grandmother living nearby, an aunt in Moscow working for KLM that could get tickets and an agency that would do all the visa application work.

She also said a girl friend had just gone to the United States so she, "Oksana", was familiar with the procedures to do the business at her end.

That deadline seemed to "stretch" further and further out, at which point she would only reply to my messages when I indicated that I might be sending her the money (which of course, I never did).

One of her photos showed Stockholm harbor and the Swedish Royal Palace in the background.

I found a picture of someone named "Galina" in the Euroladies and European Connections dating services who was identical in age and appearance and occupation (a psychologist-teacher), but lived nearby in Cheboksary.

I notified the US Embassy in Moscow that someone by her name may be attempting to get a visa to enter the United States.Lo and behold, almost in disbelief I actually did receive the 00 from Western Union that "she" had sent back to me. You are not right on the bill of the tickets a little. So, I started looking through the personal ads to try to find pictures and I looked at names that sounded similar to Ekaterina. The first name was Katy and the last names matched. Oh and because I read this blacklist I am pleased to say I lost no money. Apparently, she or Evgeny did not like having their names, addresses, phone numbers, and even photographs displayed in this Blacklist for everyone to see. My aunt works in travel agency and she did(made) a bookmark on the ticket. The following is the second letter I received from her: Letter2Thanks that was written to me the letter you see by (with) you first who has written to me through a service of acquaintances. Most "writers" are male students of the local university, department of foreign languages. According to our information, there are many scam groups in Yoshkar-Ola that are using photos of young women and write letters to men pretending to be "a Russian woman seeking for a husband".She changed her email address after her first message from [email protected] [email protected], claiming that her old email account was working badly. Her first message contained someone else's full name (a Westerner), making it appear as though my name and a few sentences had been added to an existing message. She never gave specific details about her life, claiming that she lived with her "mum" and that her father had left her at the age of 3 (sound familiar? She consistently relied on her "mum" for advice and described very realistic conversations with her and also her grandmother (sound familiar? She was incredibly beautiful and as I later found out, had sent me a photograph from when she was much younger. She knew more about the workings of Western Union than I did. She already had a passport, which was very surprising for someone who was so poor and lived so deep in Russia (Kirov). She claimed to have an aunt who worked for an airline in Moscow and who could get tickets for her at a discount, even though I wanted to buy them myself (sound familiar? She required 0 for her visa application because she claimed to be using the services of a firm in Kirov (sound familiar? She promised that she would somehow pay it back to me after she arrived, but never explained how.

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